Tag Archives: convicted rapist Jim Budd

FAKE CIVIL WAR: Boulder’s do-gooders all agree that More Homeless People = More Money

DEMAND ACCOUNTABILITY, STOP ENABLING GREEDY HOMELESS SHELTER / SERVICES PROVIDERS!

By Max R. Weller

It just tickles me no end that two of the biggest failures among local homelessness providers — Joy Eckstine-Redstone and George Epp, formerly running the defunct Carriage House homeless day shelter and chief enablers of convicted rapist Jim Budd, founder of the soon-to-be defunct Boulder Outreach for Homeless Overflow — would initiate public hostilities with Boulder Shelter for the Homeless and its executive director, Greg Harms. To be sure, BSH and the moron(s) in charge there deserve all the criticism that comes their way . . . It’s just that Ms. Eckstine-Redstone and Mr. Epp have no more credibility than Mr. Harms!

All three of ’em are CLUELESS.

Anyway, here’s the commentary in the Daily Camera: Telling secrets. Copied below in its entirety:

A homeless man panhandles on the Pearl Street Mall in February.

A homeless man panhandles on the Pearl Street Mall in February. (Paul Aiken / Staff Photographer)

Communities at their best are like families, but that’s also true for when a community is at its worst. Communities have secrets, just like families, and react in the same predictable ways. Some of us keep the secrets close, some of us are the scapegoats, and some of us stridently insist on the dysfunction being heard. Every tome on family therapy insists on a central theme: for a family (or community) to heal, that the secrets must first be acknowledged and then integrated.

What does this have to do with homelessness? There is an unspoken secret in our community. It is the lack of cooperation from the leadership at the Boulder Shelter for the Homeless. This lack of cooperation has stymied nonprofit leaders, government agencies and homeless rights group for many years. They have been approached with ideas for collaboration that were innovative, cost-saving and humane by: Bridge House, Boulder Outreach for Homeless Overflow (BOHO), Homeless Outreach Providing Encouragement (HOPE), the Community Foundation, and many others.

Now, there is a real change happening in how homeless services are designed and delivered in the city of Boulder. Courtesy of the Homeless Working Group (part of the city’s Housing and Human Service’s Department) and the Corporation for Supportive Housing (consultants hired by the city) a radical shift in services is happening. And, as many of these changes depend on the cooperation of the Boulder Shelter, homeless individuals are at risk in our community. Life-sustaining services have already been closed.

As of May 1, Boulder Outreach for Homeless Overflow ceased to provide emergency warming centers and Bridge House stopped providing day shelter. It is proposed by the Homeless Working Group that each of these services essentially be incorporated into the operations of the shelter in the fall of 2017. However, the shelter has not agreed.

And, since many of the recommendations of the working group incorporate mainstream best practices, you could argue that this is not a real problem. After all, the homeless services and homeless advocacy worlds do not disagree in principle with the ideas. It incorporates best practices like:

• Immediate assessment using validated tools that measure vulnerability;

• Short-term rental assistance to stabilize people in housing;

• Rapid re-housing that prevents long term destabilization and use of expensive services;

• Housing First services that prioritize housing for people that are mutually both the most vulnerable and the most expensive to serve.

Setting aside another questionable assumption — that Boulder as a community will agree to more low-income housing and that neighborhoods will accept such housing, this basic problem remains. The Boulder Shelter cites its management plan as the reason that they can’t provide year-round shelter or day shelter. They have been citing that management plan for years, as this certainly isn’t the first time they’ve been asked to consider these concepts. The management plan, by ordinance, must be re-evaluated every three years. It has not been changed since 2002.

Let’s examine exactly what the plan says about any needed modifications: “These hours of operation, and corresponding hours of ingress and egress of Shelter residents, may be modified by the recommendation of the Neighborhood-Shelter Action group.” Admittedly, the rest of the sentence reads “to accommodate school schedules” but it does state that it can be modified.

Additionally, the plan states, “Residents will be allowed to stay at the Shelter during the day when the weather is life threatening and other sources of day shelter are not available (such as Thanksgiving and Christmas days.)” Since there is now no other source of day shelter and many winter days in Boulder are life threatening, it appears that providing day shelter is a legitimate possibility.

This year is the next time the management plan will be re-evaluated. The city wants the shelter to provide additional services and has taken away other services in anticipation of cooperation from the shelter. But those agreements have not yet been made. We believe the shelter’s management plan needs to be modified. It is for the good of the entire community.

However, if we return to our metaphor of a dysfunctional family, we as a community are enabling the shelter. Much like the alcoholic in the family system, the city is attempting an “intervention” designed to bring the shelter into cooperation and collaboration with itself, and with other homeless service providers. Will it succeed? Let’s hope, as the lives and well-being of many homeless people hang in the balance.

Joy Redstone is director of the Student & Community Counseling Center at Naropa University. She is a former executive director of [Carriage] House. George Epp is a retired Boulder County sheriff [and board member of Carriage House].

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Over four years ago, I posted this on my blog: Boulder, CO needs a homeless people’s day center open all week. I’ve also discussed so-called best practices for homeless shelters, specifically having shelter / services in ONE location instead of spread out all over town as we see here in Boulder. Boulder Shelter for the Homeless is it! No question about it, and if Greg Harms has to be fired for this to happen then so be it.

Having said this about a year-round day shelter, I remain absolutely opposed to “emergency” overnight shelters in the summertime. A little summer rain never hurt me, nor has it hurt anyone else I know who is homeless in Boulder, but I’ll grant you that a 100-Year Flood is a special circumstance which can be dealt with if and when it occurs again in our lifetimes (NOT likely).

The Primary Goal must be to reduce the numbers of transients using finite resources which should be prioritized for Boulder County’s own homeless men, women, and children. It would seem, however, that the yahoos running things want to KEEP the Alabama arsonists, Florida sex offenders, and other riffraff from all across the nation in our city year-round. NO, HELL NO!

(E-mailed to Boulder City Council)

Official word that BOHO is finished forever:

See their website here.

You know, one of BOHO’s employees this past winter was a Marijuana Traveler I know from Indiana who only arrived here last Fall, and his entire focus in life is smoking dope. He only took the BOHO job because they paid him $14 per hour (he claimed) and he could smoke weed at work (of that, I’m certain).

There continue to be rumors about embezzlement of BOHO funds among the homeless folks at Boulder Shelter for the Homeless. I think it’s more likely that the churches were just fed up with drinking, drugging, fornicating, and vandalism at their facilities — and the various insurance carriers involved threatened to cancel their policies.

— MRW 

This predator came to Boulder, CO because the do-gooders welcome his kind

DEMAND ACCOUNTABILITY, STOP ENABLING BAD BEHAVIOR!

By Max R. Weller

Read the latest report in the Daily Camera about a rapist migrating to our city to find victims, Transient pleads guilty to sexual assault of Boulder jogger, faces more than 60 years in prison. Copied below in its entirety:

Jonathan Narucki, who pleaded guilty on Monday in connection with the sexual assault of a jogger along Boulder Creek last year, is seen in court in August.

Jonathan Narucki, who pleaded guilty on Monday in connection with the sexual assault of a jogger along Boulder Creek last year, is seen in court in August. (Cliff Grassmick / Staff Photographer)

A transient who grabbed a jogger and sexually assaulted her along the Boulder Creek Path last year pleaded guilty in Boulder District Court this morning in a deal with prosecutors that calls for at least six decades in prison.

Jonathan Narucki, 28, pleaded guilty to one count of second-degree kidnapping and one count of sexual assault.

Prosecutors and Narucki’s attorney reached a deal that calls for a 20-year sentence on the kidnapping charge and a 40-year sentence on the sexual assault charge. The two sentences are to run consecutively.

However, the sexual assault conviction falls under Colorado’s indeterminate sentencing law, which means Narucki could spend the rest of his life in prison.

Narucki — a transient from Georgia who had been in Boulder for less than a month at the time of the crime — did not speak at the hearing except to answer questions from Chief District Judge Maria Berkenkotter.

As part of the plea agreement, prosecutors dropped multiple other charges, including sexual assault, unlawful sexual contact, assault and felony menacing.

Boulder police arrested Narucki in June, a few weeks after they say he snatched a woman off of a trail near the 4700 block of Walnut Street, threatened her with a knife and then sexually assaulted her.

The woman told police that she screamed at first, but eventually complied with Narucki’s demands, because she was afraid he would hurt her. She was not able to identify Narucki, because she did not get a good look at him.

Police suspected Narucki had committed the assault — they stopped and spoke with him four times before his arrest, including on the night of the attack — but they were not able to arrest him until obtaining a DNA sample via a warrant, and linking him to the crime scene.

Narucki remains in custody at the Boulder County Jail and is due in court for sentencing on April 19.

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This is the sort of sociopathic scumbag being welcomed with lots of Free Stuff and kind words by self-styled homeless advocates and the clowns running Boulder’s shelter / services industry. Remember who the do-gooders are:

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Darren O’Connor of “Boulder Rights Watch”

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Isabel McDevitt of Bridge House

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Mike Homner of “Facing Homelessness Boulder”

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Joy Eckstine Redstone, involved in many different ways with the issue of homelessness and always as an apologist / enabler for the worst-behaved transients

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Joy with her protégé, Jim Budd — now serving time in Colorado DOC for raping a Carriage House volunteer

Of course, there are scores of other do-gooders who make it possible for the Jonathan Narucki-types of this world to commit crimes here . . . How about we ship all of ’em out along with the worst-behaved transients? Or better yet, require a valid photo ID with a Boulder County address and proof of at least one year’s residency for anyone seeking shelter / services from any Boulder, CO nonprofit.

Debate on Times-Call website

DONATING TO A NONPROFIT IS NOT THE SAME AS HELPING THE HOMELESS!

By Max R. Weller

I know that some of you have missed the knock-down-and-drag-out exchanges which used to be a regular feature of the Daily Camera website, before that newspaper decided to end all online commenting.

Here’s a little something from the Times-Call which may be entertaining:

Homeless dogs

I’m calling regarding homeless people with dogs. I don’t understand how that’s not neglect. I see them in their cars, left inside hot vehicles all summer. I call Longmont police, they check it out and nothing really becomes of it. If I wasn’t homeless and I treated a dog the way that I see them being treated, the dog could be taken off of me and taken to the humane society. I don’t understand why it’s OK for homeless people to do it.

Comment by RealityCheck: Regarding “Homeless dogs” above:

It’s NOT okay for the homeless — who can’t adequately care for themselves in most, but not all, cases — to abuse and / or neglect animals. Worst of all are the transients who “adopt” stray dogs which aren’t spayed or neutered, in order to sell the puppies to gullible passersby on Pearl Street Mall in Boulder. I’ve seen Travelers using their dogs as pack animals, too.

But, the apologists / enablers who run local nonprofits dealing with homelessness care about only one thing: $$$ from people who buy into their inappropriate compassion.

Comment by MikeRochip: If someone has a dog in a car on a hot day, that’s bad. Don’t matter how big, small or nonexistent their house is.

“Homeless People” are not a big, homogenous clump of things. You can’t talk about homeless as if they were cows or cabbages. Some homeless people are outstanding pet owners, some are not.

Some home owners are horrible pet owners, but no one writes letters saying “home owners need to be better with animals…”

RealityCheck: “Some homeless people are outstanding pet owners . . .” Can you name one?

Having been a homeless man living in Boulder County since early 2008, I’ve known dozens of homeless pet owners. I can’t think of one who was “outstanding” as you put it, nor can I think of one who was even able to provide basic veterinary care in addition to adequate food and shelter for their companion.

Saying that some homeowners are also guilty of animal abuse / neglect is self-evident, but absolutely does NOT excuse homeless pet owners in any way.

MikeRochip: There was this story in the TC a week or so ago:
http://www.timescall.com/ci_30…

But you’re missing my point. Don’t categorize all homeless people as the same. You can’t say “homeless people are this” anymore than you can say “bicyclists are this” or “drinkers are this.” The groups are too large and too diverse.

Some people would have gone thru your experience and come out with empathy for other down on their luck folks. I guess it’s also possible that some , like you, would come out with contempt.

RealityCheck: Anything is possible. What is a CERTAINTY is that you have never walked in my shoes and therefore have no idea what I think or feel about anything — except for that which I choose to share with the public in general.

As to Carriage House and the homeless characters profiled in that story, it’s a typical Daily Camera puff piece. The DC wrote similar glowing reports about Jim Budd, who worked at Carriage House and went on to found Boulder Outreach for Homeless Overflow — before raping a CH volunteer and being sent to prison for 25+ years. Those of us who have lived as homeless men and women in Boulder know the ugly truth about transients and the greedy “nonprofits” which enable their bad behavior, all for the sake of more $$$ from donors who want to Feel Good about themselves.

Like many others, I quit going to Carriage House over seven years ago, after learning what a scam it really is.

And I will say this about do-gooders: ALL OF YOU are clueless, because you lack critical thinking skills and reject any notion of objectivity.

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I was tempted to add a link to the heartbreaking story of “Tater” but I thought that would be piling on poor Mike . . .

Oh, what the hell — Read Boulder police: Man kicked, stomped, dragged 4-month-old puppy ‘Tater’ from the DC in August of 2012.

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Edward McMorris (Boulder County Sheriff’s Office)