Monthly Archives: January 2019

How are the homeless faring, so far?

(Only a FOOL will sleep on concrete in cold weather, as shown in the photo above.)

Quoting from article:

But some people who [are] on the streets still plan to stay out in the arctic conditions. At a tent city on the southwest side of Chicago, George Arroyo told Fox News on Tuesday it was better to stay in his tent than go off to a shelter.

“A shelter is going to be crowded,” he told Fox News. “Most of the shelters, they got bed bugs and we have heaters and plenty of gas. Ain’t no sense to go to a shelter.”

Arroyo told Fox News’ Mike Tobin he had extra heaters in case the main heating supply in his tent goes out.

This guy sounds like he has his act together.

I googled about “homeless deaths in polar vortex” and found no mention of any rise in deaths due to hypothermia, just news about preparations for sheltering more folks (along with the usual fatal heart attacks shoveling snow stories):

(Click on image to enlarge.)

— MRW

‘McClintock’ is showing on TCM right now

I mention this because it’s one of my favorite western movies, directed by Andrew McLaglen, with a great cast in tender scenes of domestic bliss, like this one:

Image result for john wayne spanking maureen o'hara

John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara

And there’s also this one:

Image result for patrick wayne spanking stefanie powers

Stefanie Powers and Patrick Wayne

The highlight of this film is a scene called The Mud Bath Brawl. It concludes with a most politically incorrect shot in which the Indian chief declares, “Ho Maclin, Ho Maclin, good party, but no whiskey — we go home!”

Seems like nobody has any sense of humor these days, and we’re all poorer for it.

— MRW

‘Progressive Race to the Bottom’

See the commentary from National Review here.

One line stands out to me:

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a valuable reminder of how university education results in self-importance coupled with witlessness.

I continue to believe that President Trump, as much as I dislike and even despise him on a personal level, is mostly pursuing necessary policies both here at home and abroad. And the extreme behavior of the Far Left is boosting his chances at reelection in 2020, no matter what polls purport to show.

However, the absurd notion of a National Popular Vote Interstate Compact ought to alarm anyone who paid attention during civics class in high school. What is the motive for it? Colorado voters could possibly see their choice for president nullified, based on whom a certain number of other states’ voters choose . . . It’s crazy!

People who support the NPVIC (sounds like a new and virulent strain of venereal disease, doesn’t it?) are lacking in a fundamental understanding of American government:

Scary ideas with sketchy motives, based on sheer ignorance and disrespect for an electoral system which has served the country’s interests over the long run.

BTW, should we go back in history and officially reverse the outcome of the 1960 presidential race? There’s little or no doubt that it was organized voter fraud by Democratic Party machines in Illinois and Texas which gave the election to Sen. John F. Kennedy by the narrowest of popular vote margins (but a comfortable electoral vote edge). What if Nixon had chosen to denounce the results, and proposed some radical solution to give him the popular vote in both Illinois and Texas, along with their electoral votes? Here’s an interactive 1960 electoral vote map, in which I moved those two states into Nixon’s column.

I think it’s safe to say that Democrats would have rioted in the streets had their CROOKED machinations been reversed in such a manner. We can be grateful that Nixon and Republicans let it slide, as dirty a deal as it was!

It’s long overdue for Hillary Clinton to concede the 2016 election, instead of encouraging bitter feelings among the more unhinged members of her party (and there are a lot of ’em).

— MRW

This is how charity should be:

If “church and friends” had donated all of this stuff to a homeless shelter, at least half of it would have been wasted! (Based on my firsthand observations of Boulder Shelter for the Homeless over the course of a decade.)

Please help the people in need whom you know personally. My friends have made all the difference in my life, and words are inadequate to express my gratitude; i’m sure everyone who is touched by the generosity of those we know feels the same way.

Charity begins at home.

— MRW

‘Hypothermia – Symptoms and cause’

See the webpage from the Mayo Clinic here.

Copied below in its entirety:

Overview

Hypothermia is a medical emergency that occurs when your body loses heat faster than it can produce heat, causing a dangerously low body temperature. Normal body temperature is around 98.6 F (37 C). Hypothermia (hi-poe-THUR-me-uh) occurs as your body temperature falls below 95 F (35 C).

When your body temperature drops, your heart, nervous system and other organs can’t work normally. Left untreated, hypothermia can eventually lead to complete failure of your heart and respiratory system and eventually to death.

Hypothermia is often caused by exposure to cold weather or immersion in cold water. Primary treatments for hypothermia are methods to warm the body back to a normal temperature.

Symptoms

Shivering is likely the first thing you’ll notice as the temperature starts to drop because it’s your body’s automatic defense against cold temperature — an attempt to warm itself.

Signs and symptoms of hypothermia include:

  • Shivering
  • Slurred speech or mumbling
  • Slow, shallow breathing
  • Weak pulse
  • Clumsiness or lack of coordination
  • Drowsiness or very low energy
  • Confusion or memory loss
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Bright red, cold skin (in infants)

Someone with hypothermia usually isn’t aware of his or her condition because the symptoms often begin gradually. Also, the confused thinking associated with hypothermia prevents self-awareness. The confused thinking can also lead to risk-taking behavior.

When to see a doctor

Call 911 or your local emergency number if you suspect someone has hypothermia.

While you wait for emergency help to arrive, gently move the person inside if possible. Jarring movements can trigger dangerous irregular heartbeats. Carefully remove his or her wet clothing, replacing it with warm, dry coats or blankets.

Causes

Hypothermia occurs when your body loses heat faster than it produces it. The most common causes of hypothermia are exposure to cold-weather conditions or cold water. But prolonged exposure to any environment colder than your body can lead to hypothermia if you aren’t dressed appropriately or can’t control the conditions.

Specific conditions leading to hypothermia include:

  • Wearing clothes that aren’t warm enough for weather conditions
  • Staying out in the cold too long
  • Being unable to get out of wet clothes or move to a warm, dry location
  • Falling into the water, as in a boating accident
  • Living in a house that’s too cold, either from poor heating or too much air conditioning

How your body loses heat

The mechanisms of heat loss from your body include the following:

  • Radiated heat. Most heat loss is due to heat radiated from unprotected surfaces of your body.
  • Direct contact. If you’re in direct contact with something very cold, such as cold water or the cold ground, heat is conducted away from your body. Because water is very good at transferring heat from your body, body heat is lost much faster in cold water than in cold air. Similarly, heat loss from your body is much faster if your clothes are wet, as when you’re caught out in the rain.
  • Wind. Wind removes body heat by carrying away the thin layer of warm air at the surface of your skin. A wind chill factor is important in causing heat loss.

Risk factors

Risk factors for hypothermia include:

  • Exhaustion. Your tolerance for cold diminishes when you are fatigued.
  • Older age. The body’s ability to regulate temperature and to sense cold may lessen with age. And some older adults may not be able to communicate when they are cold or to move to a warm location if they do feel cold.
  • Very young age. Children lose heat faster than adults do. Children may also ignore the cold because they’re having too much fun to think about it. And they may not have the judgment to dress properly in cold weather or to get out of the cold when they should.
  • Mental problems. People with a mental illness, dementia or other conditions that interfere with judgment may not dress appropriately for the weather or understand the risk of cold weather. People with dementia may wander from home or get lost easily, making them more likely to be stranded outside in cold or wet weather.
  • Alcohol and drug use. Alcohol may make your body feel warm inside, but it causes your blood vessels to expand, resulting in more rapid heat loss from the surface of your skin. The body’s natural shivering response is diminished in people who’ve been drinking alcohol. In addition, the use of alcohol or recreational drugs can affect your judgment about the need to get inside or wear warm clothes in cold weather conditions. If a person is intoxicated and passes out in cold weather, he or she is likely to develop hypothermia.
  • Certain medical conditions. Some health disorders affect your body’s ability to regulate body temperature. Examples include an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism), poor nutrition or anorexia nervosa, diabetes, stroke, severe arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, trauma, and spinal cord injuries.
  • Medications. Some drugs can change the body’s ability to regulate its temperature. Examples include certain antidepressants, antipsychotics, narcotic pain medications and sedatives.

Complications

People who develop hypothermia because of exposure to cold weather or cold water are also vulnerable to other cold-related injuries, including:

  • Freezing of body tissues (frostbite)
  • Decay and death of tissue resulting from an interruption in blood flow (gangrene)

Prevention

Staying warm in cold weather

Before you or your children step out into cold air, remember the advice that follows with the simple acronym COLD — cover, overexertion, layers, dry:

  • Cover. Wear a hat or other protective covering to prevent body heat from escaping from your head, face and neck. Cover your hands with mittens instead of gloves.
  • Overexertion. Avoid activities that would cause you to sweat a lot. The combination of wet clothing and cold weather can cause you to lose body heat more quickly.
  • Layers. Wear loosefitting, layered, lightweight clothing. Outer clothing made of tightly woven, water-repellent material is best for wind protection. Wool, silk or polypropylene inner layers hold body heat better than cotton does.
  • Dry. Stay as dry as possible. Get out of wet clothing as soon as possible. Be especially careful to keep your hands and feet dry, as it’s easy for snow to get into mittens and boots.

Keeping children safe from the cold

To help prevent hypothermia when children are outside in the winter:

  • Dress infants and young children in one more layer than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
  • Bring children indoors if they start shivering — that’s the first sign that hypothermia is starting.
  • Have children come inside frequently to warm themselves when they’re playing outside.
  • Don’t let babies sleep in a cold room.

Winter car safety

Whenever you’re traveling during bad weather, be sure someone knows where you’re headed and at what time you’re expected to arrive. That way, if you get into trouble on your way, emergency responders will know where to look for your car.

It’s also a good idea to keep emergency supplies in your car in case you get stranded. Supplies may include several blankets, matches, candles, a clean can where you can melt snow into drinking water, a first-aid kit, dry or canned food, a can opener, tow rope, booster cables, compass, and a bag of sand or kitty litter to spread for traction if you’re stuck in the snow. If possible, travel with a cellphone.

If you’re stranded, put everything you need in the car with you, huddle together and stay covered. Run the car for 10 minutes each hour to warm it up. Make sure a window is slightly open and the exhaust pipe isn’t covered with snow while the engine is running.

Alcohol

To avoid alcohol-related risks of hypothermia, don’t drink alcohol:

  • If you’re going to be outside in cold weather
  • If you’re boating
  • Before going to bed on cold nights

Cold-water safety

Water doesn’t have to be extremely cold to cause hypothermia. Any water that’s colder than normal body temperature causes heat loss. The following tips may increase your survival time in cold water if you accidentally fall in:

  • Wear a life jacket. If you plan to ride in a watercraft, wear a life jacket. A life jacket can help you stay alive longer in cold water by enabling you to float without using energy and by providing some insulation. Keep a whistle attached to your life jacket to signal for help.
  • Get out of the water if possible. Get out of the water as much as possible, such as climbing onto a capsized boat or grabbing onto a floating object.
  • Don’t attempt to swim unless you’re close to safety. Unless a boat, another person or a life jacket is close by, stay put. Swimming will use up energy and may shorten survival time.
  • Position your body to minimize heat loss. Use a body position known as the heat escape lessening position (HELP) to reduce heat loss while you wait for assistance. Hold your knees to your chest to protect the trunk of your body. If you’re wearing a life jacket that turns your face down in this position, bring your legs tightly together, your arms to your sides and your head back.
  • Huddle with others. If you’ve fallen into cold water with other people, keep warm by facing each other in a tight circle.
  • Don’t remove your clothing. While you’re in the water, don’t remove clothing because it helps to insulate you from the water. Buckle, button and zip up your clothes. Cover your head if possible. Remove clothing only after you’re safely out of the water and can take measures to get dry and warm.

Help for at-risk people

For people most at risk of hypothermia — infants, older adults, people who have mental or physical problems, and people who are homeless — community outreach programs and social support services can be of great help. If you’re at risk or know someone at risk, contact your local public health office for available services, such as the following:

  • Assistance for paying heating bills
  • Check-in services to see if you and your home are warm enough during cold weather
  • Homeless shelters
  • Community warming centers, safe and warm daytime locations where you can go during cold weather

Diagnosis

The diagnosis of hypothermia is usually apparent based on a person’s physical signs and the conditions in which the person with hypothermia became ill or was found. Blood tests also can help confirm hypothermia and its severity.

A diagnosis may not be readily apparent, however, if the symptoms are mild, as when an older person who is indoors has symptoms of confusion, lack of coordination and speech problems.

Treatment

Seek immediate medical attention for anyone who appears to have hypothermia. Until medical help is available, follow these first-aid guidelines for hypothermia.

First-aid

  • Be gentle. When you’re helping a person with hypothermia, handle him or her gently. Limit movements to only those that are necessary. Don’t massage or rub the person. Excessive, vigorous or jarring movements may trigger cardiac arrest.
  • Move the person out of the cold. Move the person to a warm, dry location if possible. If you’re unable to move the person out of the cold, shield him or her from the cold and wind as much as possible. Keep him or her in a horizontal position if possible.
  • Remove wet clothing. If the person is wearing wet clothing, remove it. Cut away clothing if necessary to avoid excessive movement.
  • Cover the person with blankets. Use layers of dry blankets or coats to warm the person. Cover the person’s head, leaving only the face exposed.
  • Insulate the person’s body from the cold ground. If you’re outside, lay the person on his or her back on a blanket or other warm surface.
  • Monitor breathing. A person with severe hypothermia may appear unconscious, with no apparent signs of a pulse or breathing. If the person’s breathing has stopped or appears dangerously low or shallow, begin CPR immediately if you’re trained.
  • Provide warm beverages. If the affected person is alert and able to swallow, provide a warm, sweet, nonalcoholic, noncaffeinated beverage to help warm the body.
  •  Use warm, dry compresses. Use a first-aid warm compress (a plastic fluid-filled bag that warms up when squeezed) or a makeshift compress of warm water in a plastic bottle or a dryer-warmed towel. Apply a compress only to the neck, chest wall or groin.Don’t apply a warm compress to the arms or legs. Heat applied to the arms and legs forces cold blood back toward the heart, lungs and brain, causing the core body temperature to drop. This can be fatal.
  • Don’t apply direct heat. Don’t use hot water, a heating pad or a heating lamp to warm the person. The extreme heat can damage the skin or, even worse, cause irregular heartbeats so severe that they can cause the heart to stop.

Medical treatment

Depending on the severity of hypothermia, emergency medical care for hypothermia may include one of the following interventions to raise the body temperature:

  • Passive rewarming. For someone with mild hypothermia, it is enough to cover them with heated blankets and offer warm fluids to drink.
  • Blood rewarming. Blood may be drawn, warmed and recirculated in the body. A common method of warming blood is the use of a hemodialysis machine, which is normally used to filter blood in people with poor kidney function. Heart bypass machines also may need to be used.
  • Warm intravenous fluids. A warmed intravenous solution of salt water may be put into a vein to help warm the blood.
  • Airway rewarming. The use of humidified oxygen administered with a mask or nasal tube can warm the airways and help raise the temperature of the body.
  • Irrigation. A warm saltwater solution may be used to warm certain areas of the body, such as the area around the lungs (pleura) or the abdominal cavity (peritoneal cavity). The warm liquid is introduced into the affected area with catheters.

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

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If you’re homeless in Boulder, CO and sleeping outside, you MUST be equipped with an abundance of warm winter clothing, including 100% polyester thermal underwear (not cotton), one or more pairs of thick pants, one or more thick shirts, insulated boots, insulated gloves, and a ski mask or balaclava to cover your face, and a water-resistant heavy winter coat.

For camping gear, I always used a tarp as ground cover, then a sleeping pad, a zero degree-rated sleeping bag, wool or wool-blend blankets and/or comforters, then a much larger tarp to cover everything. Tarp has to be staked down securely, due to the strong winds along the Front Range. 

All of these items are available at different Free Giveaway venues in Boulder, or for a modest price at Walmart. If you do day labor or panhandle, you can easily afford the costs, if you don’t waste $$$ on cigarettes, booze, and dope.

It’s not likely you’ll want to carry, or drag, all of this stuff around with you all day. So, it’s very important to find a campsite off the beaten path where others won’t be able to find it and steal from you. (Nothing worse than returning to your camp and finding it’s GONE.)

Image result for boulder county, co heavy snow in woods images

— MRW