E-mail from Police Chief Greg Testa to Boulder City Council re: Sexually Violent Predator at Boulder Shelter

Copied below in its entirety:

On May 2, 2017, at 9:46 AM, Testa, Greg <TESTAG@bouldercolorado.gov<mailto:TESTAG@bouldercolorado.gov>> wrote:

Dear Council Members,

As you may know Christopher Lawyer, a parolee and person who has been identified as a sexually violent predator by the State of Colorado has registered with the police department and indicated he is going to be staying at the Shelter.  Mr. Lawyer was originally arrested for committing crimes in Boulder and convicted in 2001.  He served 16 years in the Department of Corrections and was paroled in 2016 to his mother’s house just east of the city limits in unincorporated Boulder County.  At some point during his stay at his mother’s house he violated the terms of his parole and was rearrested and served six months.

He was recently released and had plans to live in Jamestown.  Mr. Lawyer didn’t move to Jamestown for several reasons, including limited cell service, which is needed for his ankle monitor.  Also, law enforcement response to Jamestown is 30-40 minutes away.   He then had plans to move to Longmont and to stay in a motel.  The motel owner indicated he could not stay due to community concern.

The Boulder Police Department was recently told that Mr. Lawyer would be staying at the Shelter.  We were not involved in the decision making process in this case or in any similar case.  I have been told that the Shelter has “parole beds”, which I was not aware of.  Additionally, Shelter staff has stated that it’s law enforcement’s policy for paroled sex offenders to say at the Shelter rather than  live on the street, because we (law enforcement) know the location where the offender is staying.  I think it’s accurate to say that law enforcement would prefer an offender to be registered and staying at a physical location with an address, in lieu of living on the street or in a vehicle; however, we would prefer that these types of offenders not come to our community in the first place.   I am not aware of any local law enforcement policy regarding this assertion. (Emphasis is mine — MRW)

The Boulder Police Department has notified our community that Mr. Lawyer has registered and is staying at the Shelter.  We have had many conversations with State officials regarding this matter and have spoken with Shelter staff.  We are continuing to meet and gather information to determine how long Mr. Lawyer will be staying at the Shelter and we are following up on information that he may be moving his parole out of state.

The State of Colorado has specific laws regarding sex offenders and those individuals who have been labeled sexually violent predators (SVP’s), including registering with the local law enforcement agency in the community they are going to reside.  The Boulder Police Department, like other law enforcement agencies, is not consulted in agreeing to allow these offenders to stay in their communities.  We often learn they will reside in our community when they register with us as required by law.

I hope this information helps to understand this situation better.

Sincerely, Greg

—————————————————————————–

What I understand is that Greg Harms (executive director) and others in charge at Boulder Shelter for the Homeless think they can pull the wool over everyone’s eyes! Read the paragraph I italicized above again:

The Boulder Police Department was recently told that Mr. Lawyer would be staying at the Shelter.  We were not involved in the decision making process in this case or in any similar case.  I have been told that the Shelter has “parole beds”, which I was not aware of.  Additionally, Shelter staff has stated that it’s law enforcement’s policy for paroled sex offenders to say at the Shelter rather than  live on the street, because we (law enforcement) know the location where the offender is staying.  I think it’s accurate to say that law enforcement would prefer an offender to be registered and staying at a physical location with an address, in lieu of living on the street or in a vehicle; however, we would prefer that these types of offenders not come to our community in the first place.   I am not aware of any local law enforcement policy regarding this assertion. (Emphasis is mine — MRW)

Well, I think Chief Testa is speaking for the vast majority of Boulderites in stating that “. . . we would prefer that these types of offenders not come to our community in the first place.”

AMEN to that!

Really, I’m beginning to think it might be best for everyone — including the many adult survivors of sexual abuse who stay at BSH — if the place just closed down permanently. After all, back in Boulder, CO’s celebrated Hippie Era over 40 years ago there were NO homeless shelter / services providers, and the hippies got along much better then than do the homeless people here now.

Sexually Violent Predator Christopher Lawyer, soon to be a resident of Boulder Shelter for the Homeless at 4869 N. Broadway.

I’ll end today’s post with this question: How are Greg Harms and the other rapist-friendly staff at BSH able to sleep at night?

— MRW

Addendum: Here’s the scoop on the money Boulder Shelter will be receiving from the Colorado DOC: How a sexually violent predator secured a ‘parole bed’ from KUSA-TV. Copied below in its entirety:

KUSA – A sexually violent predator on parole who was unable to find housing in Jamestown and Longmont now lives in Boulder with the help of a voucher system for parolees run by the Colorado Department of Corrections. 

Boulder Police notified the community Monday that Christopher Lawyer, 42, secured a parole bed at the privately-run Boulder Shelter for the Homeless off Broadway and Lee Hill Drive.

A spokesman for the DOC says a parole bed refers to when the department pays a shelter or motel to temporarily house a parolee while that person seeks permanent housing. Interim public information officer Mark Fairbairn says shelters do not specially designate space at their facilities for parolees. Across Colorado, the DOC says 196 offenders are living in shelters.

Fairbairn says costs can vary depending where a parolee is staying. In Lawyer’s case, Fairbairn says it ranges from $60 to $280 per week. The state will continue to fund Lawyer’s stay at the shelter while he looks for more permanent housing to prevent him from living on the streets.

The shelter’s executive director Greg Harms says Lawyer could live at the shelter for up to 60 days, which is the limit placed on all guests during the summer. Lawyer must also follow the same rules as non-parolees, Harms said.

Lawyer pleaded guilty in 2001 to first and second degree sexual assault. He was accused of kidnapping and raping a newspaper delivery woman at gunpoint in Boulder. The DOC prevented him from moving to Jamestown in late April in part because of concerns raised by the community. A planned move to Longmont also fell through on Sunday

Boulder Police Chief Greg Testa told city council Tuesday night that the police department plans to meet with shelter staff Wednesday to learn more about Lawyer’s living arrangements. Testa also said Lawyer is a life-time parolee and would have to register his address monthly with police. 

According to Testa, Lawyer wears a GPS ankle monitor and the terms of his parole heavily restrict his movements outside of the shelter. Lawyer is also unemployed and doesn’t own a car, Testa said.

Boulder has a total of 123 registered sex offenders, Testa announced. Two, including Lawyer, are labeled sexually violent predators. Testa says people can register online to receive notifications when a sex offender moves into their zip code. 

The DOC currently tracks how many parolees are homeless. It did not have the exact number immediately available.

————————————————————————— 

Lots of good info here that the Daily Camera missed (imagine that).

I’ve also caught Greg Harms in ANOTHER LIE: Mr. Lawyer can sign up for the First Step / Transition Program at BSH and stay there for 9 months! The 60-day limit only applies to the Summer Bed Program.

— MRW 

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One thought on “E-mail from Police Chief Greg Testa to Boulder City Council re: Sexually Violent Predator at Boulder Shelter

  1. Renee

    I think it would be best if sexual predators were never released from prison. At present, we have no way to rehabilitate them.

    Reply

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